General Chat About Films And That

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linus
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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by linus » Sat Aug 18, 2012 6:38 pm

where's ben breakfast in the ruins when you need him?

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by roundbitsofplastic » Tue Aug 21, 2012 10:25 am

Love Film update: I mentioned it to my new housemate and she;s been thinking about it for ages too. This is a good thing.
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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by tompony » Tue Aug 21, 2012 10:43 am

You ready for that code? I've picked up my viewing again now that the Olympics is over, and found that my list is full of films that I don't remember selecting. That's QUITE FUN, though!

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by roundbitsofplastic » Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:46 am

tompony wrote:You ready for that code? I've picked up my viewing again now that the Olympics is over, and found that my list is full of films that I don't remember selecting. That's QUITE FUN, though!
Not just yet, Tom. I'm moving this week, but I got HELLA SHIT going on on top of that.

What am I saying, yeah, go on, send me the code and I will totes try not to lose it before I'm ready to use it in a couple of weeks. Could you either PM it to me or send it to my gmail address? Thanks!
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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by tompony » Tue Aug 21, 2012 12:01 pm

Yep, will do later on!

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by this clump of trees » Wed Aug 22, 2012 4:28 pm

saw "the avengers". this was a big, dumb, friendly movie. politics were buried under a lot of corny jokes and explosions and the incredible hulk's incredible temper tantrums. lots of talking over an empty story w/ lots of plotholes, which you could overlook because the movie was fast-paced and busy enough to take your mind off of your problems. all the actors delivered capable performances. mark ruffalo was the best hulk i've seen since bill bixby.

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by this clump of trees » Sat Sep 15, 2012 3:03 pm

i'm not saying Prometheus didn't have problems, but it was a lot better than i expected, and it had all the necessary ingredients to be great

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by this clump of trees » Sat Sep 15, 2012 4:51 pm

here are the things i would have changed. charlize theron should have been a robot. the movie should have ended with all the humans dead and only the robots left to wander forever on the moon. vickers carrying david's head around, the two constantly getting on each others nerves, searching in vain for organic life. peter o' toole should have been cast as old man weyland. maybe this shouldn't have been an alien prequel, it could have been a pretty good story in its own right if ridley scott had just listened to me!

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by this clump of trees » Sun Sep 23, 2012 4:09 pm

oh my god, this imdb review of Turin Horse is the funniest thing
After an hour of watching people eat a potato (utter nonsense), or enjoying the thrill of a wild trip to the well to get water, the film's most dramatic moment arrives. On a particularly exciting evening when the near-mute father and daughter are watching clothes dry (I only wish I was making this up) a guest arrives. He spouts off some viewpoints that are obliquely Nietzshean and leaves. Then, it's back to the potatoes, wind, dismal music, and clothes drying. The film follows six days in the lives of the world's most vegetative humans. In truth, you would get more emotional angst from a celery stalk. It is not filmed in real time, but it feels as though it is.

Oh yeah, the horse. The horse supplies the intellectual content for the film. The horse dreams of having an opposable thumb so that he can pick up a pistol and shoot himself. Since he cannot, he develops an elaborate scheme of making his owner so angry that the owner will do this for him. Alas, the plan goes awry when the owner realizes he is trapped in a huge philosophical dilemma: If I shoot the horse, I have no horse. To be or not to be, that is the farmer's question. Eventually, the horse, being a true stoic, understands that he can only control himself and not others. He, thus, decides to starve himself to death, as death by boredom would take too long. Does the horse succeed? Watch this two and a half hour film to find out.

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by This Is Helena » Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:48 pm

diamond gala wrote:oh my god, this imdb review of Turin Horse is the funniest thing
After an hour of watching people eat a potato (utter nonsense), or enjoying the thrill of a wild trip to the well to get water, the film's most dramatic moment arrives. On a particularly exciting evening when the near-mute father and daughter are watching clothes dry (I only wish I was making this up) a guest arrives. He spouts off some viewpoints that are obliquely Nietzshean and leaves. Then, it's back to the potatoes, wind, dismal music, and clothes drying. The film follows six days in the lives of the world's most vegetative humans. In truth, you would get more emotional angst from a celery stalk. It is not filmed in real time, but it feels as though it is.

Oh yeah, the horse. The horse supplies the intellectual content for the film. The horse dreams of having an opposable thumb so that he can pick up a pistol and shoot himself. Since he cannot, he develops an elaborate scheme of making his owner so angry that the owner will do this for him. Alas, the plan goes awry when the owner realizes he is trapped in a huge philosophical dilemma: If I shoot the horse, I have no horse. To be or not to be, that is the farmer's question. Eventually, the horse, being a true stoic, understands that he can only control himself and not others. He, thus, decides to starve himself to death, as death by boredom would take too long. Does the horse succeed? Watch this two and a half hour film to find out.
I really want to see that film now.
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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by boney » Sat Sep 29, 2012 3:31 pm

<3 <3 <3 Béla Tarr <3 <3 <3

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by boney » Sat Oct 06, 2012 10:35 am

Watched 'Bunny Lake Is Missing' last night. Such an odd film. B&W, 1965, Otto Preminger directed. It could be 50s except for the slightly shoehorned in appearances of The Zombies* (*the band, not the brainmunching raised-arm marching hoons). An American woman newly arrived in London goes to collect her daughter from her first day at nursery school. The child cannot be found. The police are involved. There is a struggle to ascertain that the child actually exists. For ages it seems like the woman, and her creepy brother (played by Keir Dullea, of 2001:A Space Odyssey fame) are fabricating the existence of the child. Then the story twists, the tension gets ratcheted up and the final quarter became for me one of those films which manipulates your emotions and reaction in a way you have no actual control over. There are a few moments of understated visual menace, seemingly innocuous camera movements, one particular moment where the main protagonist slides out of bed that made my flesh crawl. I have no idea why.

*MAD Magazine's comment on The Zombies insertion into the film:

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by Dan » Mon Oct 08, 2012 11:03 pm

Several years ago snorkachu watched Punishment Park, and after due consideration she wrote:And the prisoners probably would have mobbed the camera crew to get at their water supply.
I watched PP yesterday, and being unable to suspend my disbelief w/r/t this particular fact really spoiled my appreciation of it.

I also watched Unmann, Wittering and Zigo, which is about a bunch of boarding school kids who claim to have murdered their former teacher. It is tense.

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by Cloudy Cat » Tue Oct 09, 2012 9:37 am

I remember seeing Unman, Wittering & Zigo many years ago on late night BBC. Seemed a sort of pale shadow of If....

As I subsequently found out it was originally a play from the late fifties. Maybe If.... was a little influenced by it but not having seen Unman etc. for thirty years I'm depending on a faltering memory to make reckless assumptions.

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by this clump of trees » Wed Oct 17, 2012 12:27 am

watching Alien: Resurrection tonight. i haven't seen it before. the premise sounds really gross and wrong (200 years after the events of Alien3, Wal-Mart clones Ripley as human-xenomorph hybrid) but i figure, how bad can it be.

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by this clump of trees » Sun Mar 31, 2013 4:49 pm

so, The Ten Commandments is really about americans

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by this clump of trees » Sun Mar 31, 2013 7:26 pm

the movie Hop is about how communism goes against the natural order of things & caste systems work better because the chicks cant manage themselves, the responsibility overwhelms them & turns them in-to monsters

also chicks dont understand how supply and demand works. thats why when the latino chick foreman takes over he wants to deliver worms/birdseed/crickets to little kids instead of chocolates. only the bourgeois rabbits understand what the public wants & how to satisfy it

i dont know how they managed to smuggle such a poisonous message into a movie thats ostensibly about the Easter Bunny. i have a gnarly headache

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by Temeura » Sun Jun 02, 2013 8:14 pm

Just watched The Place Beyond The Pines. It is a truly breathtaking piece of cinema. I will watch Ryan Gosling in anything but this may be his greatest outing yet. Derek Cianfrance does an amazing job directing this and some of the cinematography is awe-inspiring.

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by this clump of trees » Sun Jul 07, 2013 11:36 pm

check out this thing i'm reading about cute/zany/interesting as aesthetic categories

http://www.cabinetmagazine.org/issues/4 ... r_ngai.php

Cuteness is a way of aestheticizing powerlessness. It hinges on a sentimental attitude toward the diminutive and/or weak, which is why cute objects—formally simple or noncomplex, and deeply associated with the infantile, the feminine, and the unthreatening—get even cuter when perceived as injured or disabled. So there’s a sadistic side to this tender emotion, as people like Daniel Harris have noted. The prototypically cute object is the child’s toy or stuffed animal.

Cuteness is also a commodity aesthetic, with close ties to the pleasures of domesticity and easy consumption. As Walter Benjamin put it: “If the soul of the commodity which Marx occasionally mentions in jest existed, it would be the most empathetic ever encountered in the realm of souls, for it would have to see in everyone the buyer in whose hand and house it wants to nestle.” Cuteness could also be thought of as a kind of pastoral or romance, in that it indexes the paradoxical complexity of our desire for a simpler relation to our commodities, one that tries in a utopian fashion to recover their qualitative dimension as use.

While the cute is thus about commodities and consumption, the zany is about performing. Intensely affective and highly physical, it’s an aesthetic of nonstop action that bridges popular and avant-garde practice across a wide range of media: from the Dada cabaret of Hugo Ball to the sitcom of Lucille Ball. You could say that zaniness is essentially the experience of an agent confronted by—even endangered by—too many things coming at her quickly and at once. Think here of Frogger, Kaboom!, or Pressure Cooker, early Atari 2600 video games in which avatars have to dodge oncoming cars, catch falling bombs, and meet incoming hamburger orders at increasing speeds. Or virtually any Thomas Pynchon novel, bombarding protagonist and reader with hundreds of informational bits which may or may not add up to a conspiracy.

The dynamics of this aesthetic of incessant doing are thus perhaps best studied in the arts of live and recorded performance—dance, happenings, walkabouts, reenactments, game shows, video games. Yet zaniness is by no means exclusive to the performing arts. So much of “serious” postwar American literature is zany, for instance, that one reviewer’s description of Donald Barthelme’s Snow White—“a staccato burst of verbal star shells, pinwheel phrases, [and] cherry bombs of … puns and wordplays”—seems applicable to the bulk of the post-1945 canon, from Ashbery to Flarf; Ishmael Reed to Shelley Jackson.

I’ve got a more specific reading of post-Fordist or contemporary zaniness, which is that it is an aesthetic explicitly about the politically ambiguous convergence of cultural and occupational performance, or playing and laboring, under what Luc Boltanski and Eve Chiapello call the new “connexionist” spirit of capitalism. As perhaps exemplified best by the maniacal frivolity of the characters played by Ball in I Love Lucy, Richard Pryor in The Toy, and Jim Carrey in The Cable Guy, the zany more specifically evokes the performance of affective labor—the production of affects and relationships—as it comes to increasingly trouble the very distinction between work and play. This explains why this ludic aesthetic has a noticeably unfun or stressed-out layer to it. Contemporary zaniness is not just an aesthetic about play but about work, and also about precarity, which is why the threat of injury is always hovering about it.

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Re: General Chat About Films And That

Post by this clump of trees » Mon Jul 08, 2013 3:35 am

i saw The Place Beyond the Pines, thought the first hour was ok because it reminded me of Drive, the second hour was cop movie trying at being thoughtful, and then the last half hour felt like a whole hour.

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