Gardening

like, y'know, crafty stuff, exercise, walking, gardening...
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Big Nose
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Re: Gardening

Post by Big Nose » Fri Jul 25, 2008 5:06 pm

crystalball wrote:This is not strictly gardening since I don't have a garden but what experience do people have of growing herbs in the kitchen? I'm thinking of getting a big pot to grow some basil, parsley and stuff like that on the window sill. My kitchen is not super light but it's not dark either. What are good conditions for herbs to grow indoors?
Your kitchen sounds perfect. They mostly don't like direct sunlight. I'd also avoid buying supermarket "living basil" type bobbins, as they're shit. Try to grow from seed, it's more fun anyway. Also I would suggest you grow in individual pots, rather than one biggy.

My (first ever) outdoor vegetable patch is doing alright. Everything is up and doing well (garlic, lettuce, leeks, spring onions). I think I am slowly transmogrifying into Alan Titchmarsh though.
My apple pies go off today.

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soft revolution
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Re: Gardening

Post by soft revolution » Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:03 am

Does anyone know why you're not supposed to mow the lawn in the wet?
And by me, I mean, Flexo.

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humblebee
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Re: Gardening

Post by humblebee » Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:11 am

Concrete wrote:Some shitting cunt of a neighbour has told our bollocks-chopped fuckwit of a letting agent that our gardenis "in quite a mess".
Y'see, I'd listen to Gardeners' Question Time much more regularly if only it adopted this sort of jaunty tone.

islandhopper
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Re: Gardening

Post by islandhopper » Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:23 am

soft revolution wrote:Does anyone know why you're not supposed to mow the lawn in the wet?
Because it's hard work?

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Colin
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Re: Gardening

Post by Colin » Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:26 am

The only reasons I can think of are that the grass cuttings would stick to your shoes and you'd trail in a right fucking mess through the house, and you might make lawn a bit muddy by walking up and down it. And if you accidentally ran over the cable with the lawnmower you might get electrocuted, er, even worse than if it was dry.
Why am I replying to this? I live on the third floor of a tenement in Glasgow. I don't even have a window box.
Last edited by Colin on Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:59 am, edited 1 time in total.

islandhopper
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Re: Gardening

Post by islandhopper » Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:30 am

islandhopper wrote: Because it's hard work?
By which I mean the grass will all stick together and clog up your lawn mower - meaning a higher chance of you sticking your hand in to free it up and losing a few fingers.

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soft revolution
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Re: Gardening

Post by soft revolution » Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:36 am

It was hard work (my mower always clogs up) and I did have to clean my kitchen immediately afterwards so that's true.

I was feeling a bit guilty at the state of my garden yesterday because my neighbour is retired and his is always imaculate, so I went out to mow the lawn. My neighbour who was also in his garden pruning a tree said "it's a bit wet for cutting the lawn isnt it" and I've been worrying that there was a massive reason like my grass will all die from some being-cut-in-the-wet fungus or something.

This weekend's big victory though was getting rid of all the weeds in between the paving slabs with one of these

Image
And by me, I mean, Flexo.

a layer of chips
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Re: Gardening

Post by a layer of chips » Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:39 am

Is that one of those things you light the cooker with?

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soft revolution
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Re: Gardening

Post by soft revolution » Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:46 am

a layer of chips wrote:Is that one of those things you light the cooker with?
Given that your cooker is from the future and has a big spiral element at the back, yes quite probably.
And by me, I mean, Flexo.

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crystalball
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Re: Gardening

Post by crystalball » Tue Aug 26, 2008 1:46 pm

Big Nose wrote:
crystalball wrote:This is not strictly gardening since I don't have a garden but what experience do people have of growing herbs in the kitchen? I'm thinking of getting a big pot to grow some basil, parsley and stuff like that on the window sill. My kitchen is not super light but it's not dark either. What are good conditions for herbs to grow indoors?
Your kitchen sounds perfect. They mostly don't like direct sunlight. I'd also avoid buying supermarket "living basil" type bobbins, as they're shit. Try to grow from seed, it's more fun anyway. Also I would suggest you grow in individual pots, rather than one biggy.
Ooops, I only just saw this. Thanks! I'll walk to the garden centre (shed) on Saturday and make things happen.

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susanb
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Re: Gardening

Post by susanb » Tue Aug 26, 2008 4:55 pm

soft revolution wrote:This weekend's big victory though was getting rid of all the weeds in between the paving slabs with one of these

Image
I used one of them on my parents driveway at the weekend too. They're also useful for scraping moss off rocks (I think I slightly broke it using it to do that, though).

I was at my parents at the weekend, and to help them out a bit I did some digging, weeding and other odd and ends around the garden. My mum wouldn't let me cut their grass as she claimed it was too wet. The reason she gave was that the lawn mower would chew the grass, but I'm sure it would've been fine.

They gave me a little set of pots with pepper seeds to grow, so I'll be sowing those soon. I've got salad leaves to grow as well, but I'm not sure if I'll have enough room on my kitchen window ledge left (I've already got basil, parsley and chives growing there).
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Big Nose
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Re: Gardening

Post by Big Nose » Fri Aug 29, 2008 11:36 pm

We're through the looking glass here, people. I have declared war on the Cabbage White butterfly. They have decimated (in the inaccurate as opposed to literal sense) my leeks. I bloody care for those leeks and they are festooned with eggs and caterpillars. So I crushed and destroyed them and will crush and destroy and Cabbage White butterflies that wander into my vegetable patch airspace. Gardening makes you hate wildlife.
My apple pies go off today.

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Re: Gardening

Post by nanski » Mon Oct 06, 2008 3:17 am

i had to declare war on caterpillars last year. I felt really guilty about it, but they were eating my plants. this year i've not had any. i hope it's because they've learned their lesson and stay out of my garden now, not that i've killed so many of them they've disappeared from the planet forever.

lawnmowers are very expensive in japan. i bought a really cheap hand operated one after someone told me it worked ok, but it's an absolute piece of rubbish. it's really damaged the grass i managed to cut, but after awhile it just stopped working completely. my patch of grass is about 1 X 5m, so that's pretty pathetic. so now what do i do? buy an expensive one (i have no place to store it, so it will have to stay outside where it will rust over in no time, even with a cover)? hire someone to come around every few weeks and cut it?

i was thinking of hiring someone to help me put in a rock garden in the remaining bit of space I haven't planted anything in yet (another 1 X 5m). the gardner my secretary hired to come around in the summer did a nice job, but he was pretty expensive (i really only need a few hours work a month; i don't want to be paying 200GBP!) if i owned the house it would be different, i would be willing to invest more. But i'm only going to live there another year and a half probably, then i'll most likely move to an apartment. the bits i've done so far look pretty nice--lots of my flowers survived the caterpillars and are really thriving now; a few things that stopped blooming (maybe from the shock of being replanted?) are flowering like crazy now; the grass i planted looks mostly healthy, except the patches that got ruined by the stupid lawnmower. I enjoy the gardening (when i'm not being bitten by mosquitos, fighting with a lawnmower, or screwing up my knees), and i love the idea of creating something pretty on this otherwise f*cked up planet, but i just can't decide if it's worth it.

i should post some pictures... maybe after the grass has had a few days to recover...
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humblebee
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Re: Gardening

Post by humblebee » Mon Oct 06, 2008 8:04 am

I'm well gonna grow veg when I move into my new house. I don't know what time of year you should plant anything though. Is there anything you can plant in November and December or is it too late for everything by then?

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Colin
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Re: Gardening

Post by Colin » Mon Oct 06, 2008 9:21 am

Pete, I've got this book:

Image

Excuse the poor-quality image. Although it's aimed at allotment gardeners I still think most of it would apply to, er, garden gardeners. The whole thing's ordered by month too, so it would be pretty handy for what you're asking. It tells you what you can plant when, and when to harvest it. From what I remember you can plant some stuff in November/December, but not all that much.

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nanski
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Re: Gardening

Post by nanski » Mon Oct 06, 2008 3:00 pm

humblebee wrote:I'm well gonna grow veg when I move into my new house. I don't know what time of year you should plant anything though. Is there anything you can plant in November and December or is it too late for everything by then?
if you ever see my friend michelle about sheffield, you should ask her. she's an expert gardener. she once told me about a website that gives you a list of things you should do every month (when to plant, when to prune, etc.), but i can't remember what it was called.
big hole! big hole! big hole! big man! big man!

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humblebee
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Re: Gardening

Post by humblebee » Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:18 pm

Thanks you two!

I think I've got Michelle's phone number, for some reason. I'd give her a call but it'd probably seem a bit weird getting a call out of the blue from someone you barely know asking about a website that tells you when to plant vegetables.

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nanski
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Re: Gardening

Post by nanski » Tue Oct 07, 2008 6:40 am

heh. i need to write to her anyway to let her know i'll be in sheffield next month; i'll ask her for the url.
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Swiss Concrete
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Re: Gardening

Post by Swiss Concrete » Tue Oct 07, 2008 7:25 pm

I grew veg a few years back and it went well...all by trial and error.

Now however I have badgers living in my garden and they rule the roost. Anything i plant will soon be dug up as they look for worms and bugs. The lawn is full of holes which makes it fun and treacherous to cut! Still, they're great to watch and easier to look after!!

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Re: Gardening

Post by Sootyzilla » Tue Oct 07, 2008 8:11 pm

nanski wrote: my patch of grass is about 1 X 5m, so that's pretty pathetic. so now what do i do? buy an expensive one (i have no place to store it, so it will have to stay outside where it will rust over in no time, even with a cover)? hire someone to come around every few weeks and cut it?
get a sheep. sheep don't rust.
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