Thee Short Story

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Martijn
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Re: Thee Short Story

Post by Martijn » Sat Aug 30, 2008 10:30 pm

The problem, no: my problem, with short stories is that I regularly get books with short stories from the library but always take them back before I have read a single page. While the only short story collection I read, Rachel Seiffert's Field Study, I really enjoyed. (Edited book title; oops.)
Last edited by Martijn on Sat Aug 30, 2008 10:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Thee Short Story

Post by squirrelboutique » Sat Aug 30, 2008 10:36 pm

I do the same thing with novels lately. I don't know why, but I've been reading almost nothing but plays and short stories for the past couple years.

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Re: Thee Short Story

Post by Martijn » Sat Aug 30, 2008 10:41 pm

Oh, I do it with novels too, but mostly because I always want to have something to read at home, in case of an emergency of something. Like, unexpectedly finishing the book I am reading. (And, apparently, a few dozen of Dimitra's books that I still want to read one day, don't suffice for that purpose.)

I did read and enjoy Dutch books with short stories, so I don't see what my problem is. Oh, and people who like subtly written snippet-like stories about ordinary people doing ordinary things should really read Seiffert's book.

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Re: Thee Short Story

Post by indiansummer » Mon Sep 01, 2008 2:49 pm

i like Philip K Dick's short stories quite a lot. Haruki Murakami writes a mean one too.

When i was in school i used to think Will Self's The Quantity Theory Of Insanity was really good (one story was certainly better than the godawful novel he expanded it into a decade later)... but Tough, Tough Toys... was pretty poor and these days i find him a bit smug and annoying all round.

Apart from that i like Carver, Checkov, Asimov (sometimes), Lessing, Bukowski, Saki... good short story writists, one and all. Obvious schmobvious.
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Post by Wise Child » Mon Sep 01, 2008 6:02 pm

The only short story collection I've read cover to cover is Salinger's Nine Stories.

I like to read short stories as mental palette cleansers. I have a copy of The New Yorker and Atlantic Monthly that have a Louise Erdrich story in each issue. I picked them up at the library for a quarter each.
I think I'm going to read them before starting East of Eden or Orlando.

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Re: Thee Short Story

Post by humblebee » Mon Apr 06, 2009 11:44 pm

The Guardian's Review section did one of its annual "short stories! why aren't they more popular? oooh, but look" pieces at the weekend.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2009/ap ... ory-debuts

This one is about lots of new short story writers from all over the world who sound quite interesting.

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Re: Thee Short Story

Post by Martijn » Tue Apr 07, 2009 8:51 am

humblebee wrote:The Guardian's Review section did one of its annual "short stories! why aren't they more popular? oooh, but look" pieces at the weekend.
Yes, that was a nice one. I still don't know why I hardly ever read them though and the article didn't give a good explanation either.

Perhaps I should force myself to read a few short story collections.

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Re: Thee Short Story

Post by islandhopper » Tue Apr 07, 2009 11:01 am

The last book of short stories I read was The Red Door by Iain Crichton Smith which is a collection of his entire short story output between '49 and '76. It's a rather hefty tome of almost 600 pages, but it doesn't feel like hard work when it's split into so many sections.
There's something quite satisfying about being able to go to bed of an evening and read an entire story rather than just a chapter or two in the middle of some other narrative.

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Re: Thee Short Story

Post by Martijn » Mon May 04, 2009 11:06 am

I tried a few short stories recently --Annie Proulx, Susan Hill-- but I didn't find them very inspiring, and I put both books away halfway through the second story. It's a shame because I like them in theory, but perhaps my choice has just been unfortunate. I did enjoy the JG Ballard story the Guardian published last week.

But now there's the exciting news that Kazuo Ishiguro, who is in my top three of favourite writers, is about to publish his first Short Story Collection!

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Re: Thee Short Story

Post by Carys » Mon May 04, 2009 11:38 am

It's funny - I think I read short stories more than anything else. It was originally borne out of being quite unwell and not having the concentration span to read novels, but I ended up writing my dissertation on Short Story theory, which I think adds to my enjoyment of them.

I'm much more likely to dip into an anthology of short stories by various writers than read a few by the same writer in quick succession, mind.

Found this amazing one by Alice Walker the other day: http://theliterarylink.com/flowers.html

I'm trying to think of my favourite short story collections. Erm...
The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien - painfully brilliant, it actually makes me cry
Flying Leap by Judy Budnitz is hilarious and wonderful
I've been reading The Swank Bisexual Winebar of Modernity by HP Tinker, which is extremely funny - particularly "The Morrissey Exhibition" - but a little PoMo for my tastes at times.

Gosh. I could go on. But I won't because I've got a train to catch.

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