Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

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stolenwine
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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by stolenwine » Sun May 10, 2009 23:21

heh, the funny thing is that it's hard to find olive oils that aren't extra virgin! well, at least online (yes we're lazy and do our shopping online. kill us!) the only one i've found is one by waitrose cook's ingredients.

i usually put extra virgin olive oil over almost everything i eat. i guess that's kind of gross, but i'm totally addicted to it.
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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by Sootyzilla » Mon May 11, 2009 01:10

I use extra virgin olive oil for most things, but I deep fry my Mars Bars in sunflower oil as I find olive oil overpowers the chocolate.
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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by susanb » Mon May 11, 2009 13:14

kingofpartick wrote:i think, even from a cost point of view, you're as well getting ordinary olive oil for cooking with.

i tend to buy decent stuff when its on offer, cause you can usually find it on deals regularly, and use it for making nice dinners, and have some sunflower oil in reserve if i just want to make scrambled eggs or the like, or be bad and fry up potato scones.
I got mocked at the weekend for having several oils for different things. I use sunflower or groundnut oil for stir fries (and potato scones), normal olive oil for some cooking (frying off things for sauces etc), good extra virgin olive oil for dressing salads and for cooking where it's not going to be overpowered by a sauce, and sesame oil for noodles and finishing off stir fries. I mainly keep the two types of olive oil to save a little money.
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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by magic tea » Mon May 11, 2009 13:37

I keep meaning to get some groundnut oil because it keeps cropping up in recipes and I don't want to make them and for them to turn out rubbish because I've used the wrong oil.

When I cook it tends to be olive oil, when my housemate cooks he tends to use vegetable oil and I can never tell the difference but I'd like to think my heart can. And usually extra virgin for on salads and for with bread etc but that doesn't happen because we're cheapass Yorkshiremen.

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by TamlaTim » Mon May 11, 2009 13:43

Tried a stuffed aubergine the other night. Well, more of a topped aubergine because I couldn’t be bothered scooping it out. Did some sweet potato, red onion, mushroom and gherkin with a bit of rosemary I think.

So yeah, it was pretty tasty, but the aubergine was a bit tough. It was a BIG aubergine but it had been roasting for nearly and hour at about 200C. Just gave it a bit of olive oil and did that and the sweet potato for 30mins, then shoved the rest on top and gave it another 30mins. A few halved cherry toms and a bit of goats cheese grated on top for the last few mins.

Any tips how I could have softened up the Aubergine a bit. My good lady suggested I might have scored it.

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by crystalball » Mon May 11, 2009 13:56

I think maybe the problem is that you didn't scoop the middle bit out - it's quite dense and elastic and doesn't cook well at all. It's not even nice to eat unless it's mashed and paired with herbs and stuff. So if you take that bit out (not all of it, just the bulk) then the aubergine will cook very nicely. You could also put it into salted water for half an hour before cooking it because that takes away the bitterness (although I rarely bother doing that and it's still fine).

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by humblebee » Mon May 11, 2009 15:09

If it was roasting for nearly an hour and still wasn't soft, I'd say it was more to do with not enough oil than not being scooped out.

Scoring would have helped though. But scooping out is better. Although it can get a bit soggy if you overdo that.

This is starting to sound vaguely filthy, so I'll stop there.

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by DimitraDaisy » Mon May 11, 2009 15:12

Just to confuse matters further, I've never scooped out an aubergine in my life -- I just poke a few holes in it with a fork or a knife, pour some oil in a tin, and roast it until it's all flat and soft. Then I open it up. It's usually all soft and gooey. And now I worry that this sounds filthy, too...
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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by crystalball » Mon May 11, 2009 15:25

DimitraDaisy wrote:Just to confuse matters further, I've never scooped out an aubergine in my life
Oh to be born so privileged! Where I grew up, if you didn't scoop out your aubergine, you wouldn't have anywhere to sleep at night. They were our dinner *and* our bed.

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by Sootyzilla » Mon May 11, 2009 18:15

You were lucky to have an aubergine. We had to scoop out a potato to sleep in.
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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by a layer of chips » Tue May 26, 2009 09:18

Can anyone give me something crazy and outrageous to do with a roast chicken? Recipe-wise, I mean, not in the biblical sense.

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by Uncle Ants » Tue May 26, 2009 10:20

a layer of chips wrote:Can anyone give me something crazy and outrageous to do with a roast chicken? Recipe-wise, I mean, not in the biblical sense.
I saw a recipe once which involved stuffing it with about 40 cloves of garlic.
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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by a layer of chips » Tue May 26, 2009 10:22

I said not in the biblical sense.

Hmm. That sounds quite nice, actually.

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by Uncle Ants » Tue May 26, 2009 10:31

I saw another recipe which involved a can of beer. You drink half the can and then sit the poor bird upright on the half empty can (apparently the boiling beer keeps it all juicy inside).

It's only mildy outrageous because the thing looks like it's going to walk about, which is a bit disconcerting.
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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by lynsosaurus » Tue May 26, 2009 14:29

you can stuff it with a load of herbs and garlic. sage and rosemary are nice with chicken, i think. or make a herb and garlic paste and put it over the skin. quite often i cut little holes in the chicken and put whole cloves of garlic in and it makes the whole thing lovely and garlicky.

i want a roast chicken now. can i come round for tea?

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by a layer of chips » Tue May 26, 2009 16:07

Yes, but only if you cook it. i reckon I'm too tired to fanny around now.

I might grill it. From frozen.

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by crystalball » Thu May 28, 2009 21:46

Please help me Anoraks. I've got two lovely artichokes that need to be used but I'm shattered and I don't want to have to do anything too complicated with them. Has anyone got any ideas?

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by squirrelboutique » Thu May 28, 2009 22:12

Baked Artichokes are pretty easy!

Maybe this recipe?

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by squirrelboutique » Thu May 28, 2009 22:13

Also, when my old roommate made those, she used to add a hard grated cheese and breadcrumbs, too.

I don't have her exact recipe because she wouldn't give it to ANYONE.

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Re: Kitchen Q&A (or, Ask Anorak about cooking and stuff)

Post by crystalball » Fri May 29, 2009 13:40

Thank you! I didn't do anything with them in the end because it was getting really late and I couldn't face all the chopping and cleaning. They'll keep in the fridge for another couple of days though, won't they, because I found something that looks like your roommate's secret recipe and I'd like to try it out:
Baked Artichokes with Breadcrumbs and Parmesan

* 90 g dry breadcrumbs
* 1 handful grated Parmesan cheese
* 2 tablespoons assorted fresh chopped herbs
* 2 tablespoons olive oil
* Salt and pepper to taste
* 2 artichokes

To prepare your globe artichokes and follow steps one to three in our preparation guide. While still warm, press the leaves gently back, leaving them attached, so that the artichoke resembled a flower. Pull out the small white and purple centre leaves and scrape out the choke (the fuzzy part) with a spoon. Preheat your oven to 190°C, 375°F, gas mark 5. Mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan, herbs and oil and season to taste with salt and pepper. Pack the breadcrumb mixture onto the artichoke. Place on a baking dish and bake for 25 minutes or until golden. To eat the artichokes, pull the leaves off and scrape the soft base of the leaf off with your teeth. When you've finished the leaves, eat the rest.
You should make this too and invite your ex-roommate round for dinner.

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