Curry!

recipes, soup, curry, baking, sandwiches, crisps, beer, pubs, alcohol
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Uncle Ants
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Re: Curry!

Post by Uncle Ants » Thu Aug 21, 2008 11:00

lynsosaurus wrote: perhaps there is a technique i am missing.
Yes, its called an electric spice mill :)
In Recordeo Speramus

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darvé
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Re: Curry!

Post by darvé » Thu Aug 21, 2008 11:10

Uncle Ants wrote:
Concrete wrote:I've never been to a branch of Wagamama, but my colleagues often go to the one in Bath for work/social occasions. Are they any good?
Not bad. Maybe not the best noodle place in the world and maybe not the cheapest but good food, reasonably priced and consistent. We sometimes go to the Nottingham branch for a bite before going to gigs at the Rescue Rooms.
Wagamamas gets a bit samey after a while though, but it's like any chain, you know what you're getting and you know it will be good.

They do a Spicy Chicken Itame in Australia, a big bowl of rice, chicken (or veg), chilis, big chunks of broccoli and courgettes and other veg. It's perfect. They don't do it in England though, the closet is the Cha Han, it's a poor substitute.

You get more Katsu curry sauce down under too.

I guess what i'm trying to say is Wagamamas is better in Australia.
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Uncle Ants
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Re: Curry!

Post by Uncle Ants » Thu Aug 21, 2008 11:13

davo wrote: I guess what i'm trying to say is Wagamamas is better in Australia.
Well they are okay like I said ... but I don't think I'd go all the way to Australia for a better one :p
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lynsosaurus
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Re: Curry!

Post by lynsosaurus » Thu Aug 21, 2008 14:14

Uncle Ants wrote: They aren't hard, but do involve a lot of different spices for a proper one. Best to follow a good recipe. I think the chances of getting a good curry from a random collection of ingredients thrown togther would be a bit ... well .... random.
heh. i've been really lucky on most occasions, and really quite unlucky on one occasion. i found this massive asian cookery book in a charity shop and it has a load of indian curry recipes in it, so i think i should get started on that.

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Re: Curry!

Post by palespectre » Wed Aug 27, 2008 11:59

ooh i just love curry... in any form. curry puff pastry for the win!
yum!

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Re: Curry!

Post by crystalball » Wed Aug 27, 2008 12:02

palespectre wrote:curry puff pastry
You can't just say that and then disappear! Please tell us more.

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Re:

Post by Jangloid Mark » Tue Sep 30, 2008 00:35

I absolutely adore curry!!!! My favourite is Shath Khkania Gohst...a fairly hot lamb curry...similar to a Jalfrezi, but, a little drier, and richer....
I also love Jalfrezi, Goan Vindaloo, Pathia - when done right...most places don't make it right at all, dhansak, to name just a few...

Thinking aloud here, a scampi madras sounds particularly appealing right now...next time I make a curry, I may just try that....not sure if it would work, though...
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Re: Re:

Post by Jangloid Mark » Sun Dec 07, 2008 03:36

Just had a Naga Jalfrezi Gohst...as much as I like a hot curry, this was a little hotter than I usually go, but, fuck, it was nice :) Also, a little drop of whiskey to was it down with went down a treat :) Surprisingly, I didn't realise until now just how well a hot curry & a drop of whiskey go together :)
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Re: Re:

Post by humblebee » Sun Dec 07, 2008 17:56

Jangloid Mark wrote:Just had a Naga Jalfrezi Gohst...as much as I like a hot curry, this was a little hotter than I usually go, but, fuck, it was nice :) Also, a little drop of whiskey to was it down with went down a treat :) Surprisingly, I didn't realise until now just how well a hot curry & a drop of whiskey go together :)
I'll have to give that a go.

Of yer standard curry house offerings, I've always thought the vindaloo was the hottest one going - or the phaal, if there's one around. So I was quite surprised when I went to Manchester and the jalfrezi was generally considered to be top of the shop.

It's a different sort of hot though isn't it? So you can't really compare them. Vindaloo is the red chilli heat and it's cooked right in to the curry and it gets hotter and hotter the more you eat. Jalfrezi heat is from green chillis, dropped in right at the end of cooking, and it's kind of an instant blast of wuh! rather than the buildy uppy thing.

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Re: Re:

Post by Jangloid Mark » Sun Dec 07, 2008 23:04

humblebee wrote:Of yer standard curry house offerings, I've always thought the vindaloo was the hottest one going - or the phaal, if there's one around. So I was quite surprised when I went to Manchester and the jalfrezi was generally considered to be top of the shop.
Usually, a phaal is much hotter than a vindaloo, and is too hot for me (although I can eat a vindaloo). A phaal is usually the hottest thing you can get.

A Jalfrezi - it depends where you go...as different curry houses make it different ways. Some make it really hot, others, it's a medium hot, comparable with a madras...

It's the addition of naga in this case that made it that much hotter...naga chillies are silly hot...[/quote]
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Re: Re:

Post by humblebee » Mon Dec 08, 2008 10:53

Jangloid Mark wrote:Usually, a phaal is much hotter than a vindaloo, and is too hot for me (although I can eat a vindaloo). A phaal is usually the hottest thing you can get.

A Jalfrezi - it depends where you go...as different curry houses make it different ways. Some make it really hot, others, it's a medium hot, comparable with a madras...

It's the addition of naga in this case that made it that much hotter...naga chillies are silly hot...
Oh right. I'm pretty sure I've never encountered them.

I had a phaal once, in Birmingham. I thought it would be a bit cheekier than it was, really. But this was when I was a leading member of the Ring of Fire, a clandestine weekly vindaloo club, so my curry heat tolerance was at its zenith.

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Re: Re:

Post by Jangloid Mark » Mon Dec 08, 2008 11:02

humblebee wrote:Oh right. I'm pretty sure I've never encountered them.

I had a phaal once, in Birmingham. I thought it would be a bit cheekier than it was, really. But this was when I was a leading member of the Ring of Fire, a clandestine weekly vindaloo club, so my curry heat tolerance was at its zenith.
Quite a few places do a naga curry down here....but, I don't think it's that widely known....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naga_Jolokia_pepper
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Re: Re:

Post by soft revolution » Mon Dec 08, 2008 11:04

humblebee wrote:Jalfrezi heat is from green chillis, dropped in right at the end of cooking, and it's kind of an instant blast of wuh! rather than the buildy uppy thing.
Jalfrezi aside, some of the poorer curry houses do this to introduce heat into all their currys. I always saw it as bad form, as essentially you get a stew with a few chillies in it as opposed to a tasty sauce.

I'm never sure how I feel about Jalfrezis, as the ones I have had tended to have little sauce and loads of bits of onion instead. Not that there's anything wrong with that, it just doesn't suit the chapatti scoop eating style.
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Re: Re:

Post by Wheatabeat » Wed Dec 10, 2008 11:20

Oooh my mate married a lovely Indian girl a few months ago. Anyway, they invited me and the girlfriend round last Saturday night and cooked some gorgeous fud for us both.

To start with, they dished up some Shammi kebabs and keema filled samosas, with a lovely cucumber, yoghurt, coriander and chilli dip. Then, for main the curry was a delightfully fresh chicken creation, heavily featuring lots of coriander, spinach, lemon, chilli and had a semi-thick sauce. She also made a gorgeous side dish of okra and chilli which looked kind of stir-fried. We ate that naturally scooped up with bits of nan bread. It just beat any curry I've had from a restaurant hands down.

I'm going to mither her for the recipe next time I'm round. Especially that okra one, it was bloody scrumptious.
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Re: Re:

Post by Jangloid Mark » Wed Dec 10, 2008 11:30

That sounds absolutely gorgeous :)
You're making me feel hungry now....
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Re: Curry!

Post by squirrelboutique » Wed Jan 14, 2009 17:27

I attempted a crock pot curry last night.

I think it's going to be absolutely awful. I'm thinking I need to stop on the way home for an auxiliary supper just in case.

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Re: Curry!

Post by paperdice » Wed Feb 04, 2009 20:32

currrrry is sooo good.

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Re: Curry!

Post by Wheatabeat » Wed Aug 12, 2009 13:55

I've perfected the art of a good base curry sauce. It's ace as apart from the onion, garlic and corriander (of which I usually have a bunch of coriander in the freezer), it's more or less all from the cupboards and knocked up in no time. It's about a Madras in heat, though take away the chilli seeds for a more medium one.

1 large onion, diced
4 cloves of garlic, finely chopped or crushed
1 tsp crushed coriander seeds (or ground corriander)
1 tsp crushed cumin seeds (or gropund cumin)
1 tsp garam masala
1 tbsp ground turmeric
1 tbsp curry powder
2 tbsp vegetable oil
A handful of mustard seeds
A handful of curry leaves
1 dash of lemon juice (I use the bottled lemon juice, don't think it makes too much difference)
1 fresh chilli, chopped (take seeds out if you like it a bit milder)
A nice big bunch of chopped corriander
1 x 400g tin of chopped tomatoes
Splash of soy sauce (I prefer to use this, even though not authentic than salt for seasonong as it turns it a lovely dark colour)

1. heat some oil in a stock pot or deep pan and drop in the mustard seeds and wait for them to start popping everywhere.
2. fry the onions, and garlic until soft.
3. Add all the crushed/dry spices and mix. You should be then left with a pasty sort of consistancy. Perhaps add a touch of water here to loosen slightly.
4. Add the chilli and fry on a high heat for 30 seconds ish.
5. Add the tin of chopped tomatoes, then fill the tin half full with water and throw in along with a splash of soy sauce and lemon juice.
6. Finish by mixing in the chopped fresh coriander then bring to the boil. Reduce a little to intensify the flavours.
7. Then add your "fill". Like I say, Chick Peas are bloody brilliant, but it'll work well with chicken, lamb, prawns or salmon.

Oh yeah, and buy your ingredients from an Indian cash and carry if possible. Really cheap and you get loads for your money. Oh yeah again, you can add a tin of coconut milk or dash of cream to make it even milder and have it like a korma/massala sauce. Up to yous.
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Re: Curry!

Post by a layer of chips » Wed Aug 12, 2009 14:04

Ooh, cheers for that. It's like discovering The Holy Grail.

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Re: Curry!

Post by Wheatabeat » Wed Aug 12, 2009 14:11

a layer of chips wrote:Ooh, cheers for that. It's like discovering The Holy Grail.
You won't go wrong following that baby.
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