Pudding room: the dessert thread

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humblebee
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Pudding room: the dessert thread

Post by humblebee » Wed Nov 07, 2007 9:25 am

It said on the radio this morning that British people are shunning their traditional puddings like bread and butter pudding and spotted dick. So I thought we should have a thread to celebrate the joy of afters. Please talk about your favourites, with recipes if you like.

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Post by Martijn » Wed Nov 07, 2007 9:36 am

Not sure how traditionally British it is, but Yeo Valley yog(h)urt is the best yog(h)urt I've ever had.

Any advice on how to spell yog(h)urt would be appreciated by the way. At the local Tesco's, they have two signs telling customers where the yog(h)urt department is, and one spells it with an h and one without.

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Post by humblebee » Wed Nov 07, 2007 9:39 am

It totally should have the h in. Never trust Tesco.

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Post by Martijn » Wed Nov 07, 2007 9:49 am

But tfd says the preferred spelling is without the h. Apparently, it comes from Turkish, where it is spelled without an h. More importantly, Yeo Valley, who are the Kings of Yogurt and therefore to be trusted, spell it without an h.

But yoghourt is correct as well, so I'm going to use that from now on.

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Post by crystalball » Wed Nov 07, 2007 10:32 am

Is apple and rhubarb crumble a traditional pudding? I love a good crumble, especially because it's dead easy to make.

I also really love bread and butter pudding although I find it's really difficult to get it just right. A lot of places use brioche instead of bread these days, which makes it far too sweet and extremely unpatriotic, if you ask me.

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Post by humblebee » Wed Nov 07, 2007 11:31 am

The whole thread doesn't need to be about traditional puddings. You can talk about posh ones if you like!

But yeah, I bloody love a good crumble an'all.

And if you don't want the skin off the custard, give it here.

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Post by Colin » Wed Nov 07, 2007 11:38 am

Speaking of custard, am I the only one who likes it cold? You can't beat a hot rhubarb crumble with cold custard.

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Post by humblebee » Wed Nov 07, 2007 11:40 am

I don't mind cold custard at all. Trifle, after all, depends on it!

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Post by lynsosaurus » Wed Nov 07, 2007 12:16 pm

I love cold custard. And cold rice pudding as well.

I love raspberries and I love fresh cream, so any pudding that combines those is a winner in my book. There's a Scottish dessert called cranachan, which is basically whisky cream layered with oatmeal and raspberries. And it is the best damn thing you will ever taste.

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Post by Colin » Wed Nov 07, 2007 12:20 pm

lynsosaurus wrote:I love cold custard. And cold rice pudding as well.
Don't you call it creamed rice? Or am I on my own on that one?

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Post by susanb » Wed Nov 07, 2007 12:23 pm

Cold custard is okay, but with hot puddings I prefer hot custard. I only like the skin on custard if it's homemade and not made from a powder (otherwise it reminds me too much of school dinners). My mum makes really lovely creamy custard, I think I'll give her a call tonight and ask for the recipe as I've never tried to make it myself before.

Crumbles are brilliant! You can even make a great crumble just with tinned pears, but apple and rhubarb is probably my favourite.

Bread and butter pudding needs lots of nutmeg to make it really tasty. I had a really good, and easy, recipe from a book I had when I was little, but I've lost the book and never wrote the recipe down so unfortunately I've never made a bread and butter pudding as nice as the one I made when I was 12.

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Post by lynsosaurus » Wed Nov 07, 2007 12:42 pm

Colin wrote:
lynsosaurus wrote:I love cold custard. And cold rice pudding as well.
Don't you call it creamed rice? Or am I on my own on that one?
You are most definitely on your own on this one.

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Post by crystalball » Tue Nov 20, 2007 3:30 pm

Here's a nice recipe for a brownie-like flat cake with biscuits.

You need

150g of good quality dark chocolate
200g caster sugar
180g unsalted butter
90g plain flour
3 eggs
half a packet of plain digestive biscuits

Roughly chop and melt the chocolate and the butter in a heat-resistant container *over* boiling hot water (bain marie) - don't put the ingredients in water!

At the same time, whisk the three eggs with the sugar for 3-4 minutes until the mixture becomes white-ish.

Empty the melted chocolate and butter into the eggs sugar mixture and fold with a spoon.

Add the flour, mix with a spoon, then chop and add the biscuits and mix again.

Empty the mixture into a small baking dish lined with baking paper and put in the oven for 25 minutes *exactly* at 180oC.

When it comes out of the oven, the cake looks a bit runny but that's fine. Leave it out to set and cool for about half an hour and then put it in the fridge for about an hour.

Then, y'know, eat it.

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Post by a layer of chips » Tue Nov 20, 2007 3:59 pm

I went to me Mum's this weekend and she gave me this bloody lovel chocolate cake that this old woman whose hair she does made for her. It's dead simple, but sometimes cake doesn't need to be complicated. As the saying goes.

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Post by alongwalkhome » Tue Nov 20, 2007 5:37 pm

We get a free pie (for Thanksgiving) today fr. the dean and every year there is a veritable stampede for apple. I think people are CRAZY because apple pie is cheap to make. I go for the pecan (expensive!) and sometimes get two cuz no one wants 'em.

I will be laughing at them over my delicious pie(s). If pie selecting were a mutual fund, I'd be LOADED. Or something.

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Post by miss deepfreeze » Fri Nov 23, 2007 4:14 pm

oh, i love pecan pie.
mmmm.

last night i made an apple and rhubarb crumble, but i used a tin of rhubarb obviously as there's none around right now.
it was scrummy, especially with some nice cream o'galloway ice cream. yum.

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Re: Pudding room: the dessert thread

Post by a layer of chips » Mon Oct 20, 2008 4:28 pm

Has anyone tried these Cadbury's Fruit & Nut ice creams? I'm scoffing one now. They're right up my alley.

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Re: Pudding room: the dessert thread

Post by sarahluv » Mon Oct 20, 2008 4:31 pm

does anyone have any tried and tested vegan dessert/cake recipes?

my friend alex is having a party soon and although there are a million recipes on the web, i'd like one that is guaranteed to work.

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Re: Pudding room: the dessert thread

Post by crystalball » Mon Oct 20, 2008 4:41 pm

Squirrelboutique posted a few recipes for vegan cupcakes over at the baking thread.

Back to traditional puddings, I tried treacle sponge the other day for the first time and it was amazing. I can't believe I've been living in Britain for over a decade and had never given it a chance. What a lovely thing.

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Re: Pudding room: the dessert thread

Post by humblebee » Mon Oct 20, 2008 4:56 pm

crystalball wrote:Back to traditional puddings, I tried treacle sponge the other day for the first time and it was amazing. I can't believe I've been living in Britain for over a decade and had never given it a chance. What a lovely thing.
Oh God. I really want some treacle sponge now. I hope you had custard on it. Oh God.

Note to self: learn to make puddings, doofus.

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