Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

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bodgers_badger
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by bodgers_badger » Sun Dec 28, 2008 6:31 pm

Sounds like Venus. It has been up and about just after sunset lately, in the SW. It looks like a really bright star until you look at it through binoculars, then you'll see a crescent shape like the moon :)

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Martijn
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by Martijn » Sun Dec 28, 2008 9:24 pm

Yes, it must be that. I had already concluded it couldn't be a star, not even a bright one, for it became visible when the sun had barely set and the sky was still too bright for stars and it moved slowly towards the SW. I don't think there's anything exciting about seeing venus, but I'm not sure if I had ever realised I could see it. Yay! Thanks. :)

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bodgers_badger
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by bodgers_badger » Mon Dec 29, 2008 12:36 am

Nothing exciting? That's another world you're looking at there!

Sorry, I've probably seen it a thousand times and it still excites me. Then again I am a big space geek :p

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Big Nose
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by Big Nose » Sat Mar 07, 2009 10:46 am

Illinois has had enough of those pencil necks at the IAU messing about with the planets and is fighting back!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/ ... o-a-planet

Dwarf planet my arse. Go Illinois!
My apple pies go off today.

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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by frogblast » Sun Mar 08, 2009 12:43 am

<yourmomjoke> Illinois also declared that your mom is still a planet </yourmomjoke>

to keep things on topic: there is something very cool about this picture
Image
It's the ISS passing in front of the moon, as seen from the ground with a telescope. (The ISS looks really tiny if you open the full size image, which is here). It was only in front of the moon for 0.49 seconds.
Sun like honey on the floor,
Warm as the steps by our back door.

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squirrelboutique
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by squirrelboutique » Sun Mar 15, 2009 6:54 pm

Less than five hours to the shuttle launch! It's exciting here because it's a night launch and we'll have a nice clear view from here at the beach.

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soft revolution
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by soft revolution » Thu Mar 19, 2009 9:51 pm

And by me, I mean, Flexo.

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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by squirrelboutique » Tue Mar 24, 2009 10:28 pm

That blog is great!

The shuttle launch was fun! There were so many people at the beach to watch it. It's nice to see that people still get that excited.

Image

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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by crystalball » Wed Mar 25, 2009 1:34 pm

That looks amazing. You're so lucky to be able to sit on the beach and watch shuttles launching and leaving trails of colour. Woh.

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Mr Bear
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by Mr Bear » Wed Mar 25, 2009 2:26 pm

soft revolution wrote:Blog from space - http://spacebook.mst.edu/2009/03/waitin ... _in_a.html

It's lovely!
Wow, what an evocative post. It's both calming and moving at the same time. Wow.

Great photo there too, Rachel.

I want to go to space.

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Mr Bear
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by Mr Bear » Thu Apr 23, 2009 9:56 am

How to blow one's own mind: work out how many miles one light year equates to, having read a story about something being picked up by a telescope which is 12.9 billion light years away.

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Martijn
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by Martijn » Thu Apr 23, 2009 10:41 am

About 12,204,432,000,000,000,000,000 says my calculator, which is about 12 septillion. Or, actually, that's kilometres, which is easier to calculate, because the speed of light is very close 300,000 km/s. In miles it's about 7.5 septillion.

(Oh, I've calculated how many km/miles that something is away from us.)

But, important question of the day: on how many days/year is a light year based? I used 365 in my calculations but light doesn't travel slower in leap years, doesn't it?

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tonieee
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by tonieee » Thu Apr 23, 2009 10:48 am

Martijn wrote:But, important question of the day: on how many days/year is a light year based? I used 365 in my calculations but light doesn't travel slower in leap years, doesn't it?
I don't actually know but to me the sensible choice would be on how long it takes the Earth to go round the Sun rather than a calendar year - so approximately 365.25 days.

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Martijn
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by Martijn » Thu Apr 23, 2009 10:51 am

According to Wikipedia it is that (of course). But scientists don't use the term much anyway.

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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by tonieee » Thu Apr 23, 2009 12:06 pm

Martijn wrote:According to Wikipedia it is that (of course). But scientists don't use the term much anyway.
I've just read the wikipedia article on parsec - I've read descriptions of it before but never understood it - I knew it was three and a bit light years but why cos it seemed like it should be variable depending on how far away an object was but the diagram there made it all make sense.

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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by gofelt » Wed Aug 05, 2009 5:35 pm

Did anyone else watch the BBC documentaries about the Apollo program and the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, a couple of weeks ago?

The Sky at Night had a really brilliant episode about the moon landing - Isn't it the best programme on british TV?! I love to watch the ever so passionate and enthusiastic Patric Moore going nuts about the Perseid Meteor Shower :-) or some new incredible photos of newborn stars and distant galaxies taken by Hubble Space Telescope!
I slice the surface here beside you/Lungs filled liquid yell I love you/Sound moves further underwater
Deep and dark my submarine bells groan in greens and grey/Mine would chime a thousand times/To make you feel okay..

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soft revolution
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by soft revolution » Wed Aug 05, 2009 6:03 pm

gofelt wrote:The Sky at Night had a really brilliant episode about the moon landing - Isn't it the best programme on british TV?! I love to watch the ever so passionate and enthusiastic Patric Moore going nuts about the Perseid Meteor Shower :-) or some new incredible photos of newborn stars and distant galaxies taken by Hubble Space Telescope!
It truely is isn't it. There were two episodes about it, after seeing the first one I had a look on replay or catch up (can't remember what it's called) and found the other. How long do episodes stay on that - it might still be there?

Slightly unrelated but I recently stumbled across this lovely timelapse video of the Milky Way rising in Texas.
And by me, I mean, Flexo.

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soft revolution
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by soft revolution » Wed Aug 05, 2009 6:14 pm

tonieee wrote:
Martijn wrote:But, important question of the day: on how many days/year is a light year based? I used 365 in my calculations but light doesn't travel slower in leap years, doesn't it?
I don't actually know but to me the sensible choice would be on how long it takes the Earth to go round the Sun rather than a calendar year - so approximately 365.25 days.
Just checked wikipedia - that's spot on 365.25 days. I wonder if they'll ever tie that definition down, seing as the time it takes the earth to orbit is slowly changing. (EDIT - oh ok, they have)

As a geeky excercise, 1 Julian year is 31,557,600 seconds. One second is defined as "the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium 133 atom" - so you should really be measuring a light year as the distance light travels during 290,097,396,344,952,000 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium 133 atom.

And I don't want to see any rounding errors :)
And by me, I mean, Flexo.

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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by islandhopper » Sat Aug 22, 2009 11:05 am

Sir Patrick Moore gets asked about space songs. Thinks they're all awful. But talks about space anyway.

Here: http://thequietus.com/articles/01994-sp ... netary-pop!

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squirrelboutique
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Re: Astrophysics and astronomy and space things

Post by squirrelboutique » Thu Aug 27, 2009 11:43 pm

I know I only come here to post about the Space Shuttle launches, but there's a night launch scheduled for tomorrow evening and I'm overly excited because those launches look extra spectacular going up over the ocean.

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