be random about science

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Martijn
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Re: be random about science

Post by Martijn » Fri Aug 08, 2008 9:22 am

The government is putting rainbows in our water supply. "We, as a nation, have to ask ourselves: what the heck is going on?"
Last edited by Martijn on Fri Aug 08, 2008 10:45 am, edited 1 time in total.

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gloom button
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Re: be random about science

Post by gloom button » Fri Aug 08, 2008 10:36 am

Does everyone love Richard Feynman? I read Six Easy Pieces a few years ago and thought it was the best thing ever; I love how you can tell how enthusiastic he is. I'd never heard him talk before though - this really is the best thing ever:

the trouble with personalities, they're too wrapped up in style
it's too personal; they're in love with their own guile

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Re: be random about science

Post by bodgers_badger » Sat Aug 09, 2008 6:00 pm

I'm still to find someone who dislikes Richard Feynman. Such a clever guy, but with a real passion for explaining it. No real intellectual snobbishness about him.

I'm trying to think of some of my favourite quotes of his (there are many), but the one that springs to my tired mind is:

"Physics is to math(s) as sex is to masturbation"

...I'm a physicist by the way ;)

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Re: be random about science

Post by frogblast » Sat Sep 06, 2008 12:52 pm

gloom button wrote:Does everyone love Richard Feynman? I read Six Easy Pieces a few years ago and thought it was the best thing ever; I love how you can tell how enthusiastic he is. I'd never heard him talk before though - this really is the best thing ever:

wow. i think that just made my day. it's almost enought to make me want to go back to studying physics. but then i go and look at this and i realise i have totally forgoten what any of it means

having said that, there was one lecture about Maxwell's equations that i will never forget - the lecturer had just finished going through the equations and i sat there thinking, wait if that equation produces an electric field from a magnetic field and that one produces a magnetic field from an electric one, isn't that just going to go on forever. and then the lecturer says "and this is how light propagates" and for a brief euphoric moment i felt like i finally understood light. of course i then remembered all that pesky quantum physics stuff that screws everything up…

when i was at school i never understood what teachers/book meant about theories/equations being beautiful, but i understand it much more these days.
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Re: be random about science

Post by soft revolution » Thu Jan 08, 2009 9:19 pm

How pretty are Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities

Image

Scale it up...

Image
And by me, I mean, Flexo.

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Re: be random about science

Post by squirrelboutique » Thu Jan 15, 2009 8:35 pm

Hello!

Can someone give me a simplified summary (shortish) of this article? I'm fascinated by the title. I'm going to give it another read to try to get it, but it's likely going to make my tiny brain bleed or even burst.

Our world may be a giant hologram

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Re: be random about science

Post by Gordon » Thu Jan 15, 2009 8:59 pm

Pfft 1:
No one - including Hogan - is yet claiming that GEO600 has found evidence that we live in a holographic universe. It is far too soon to say. "There could still be a mundane source of the noise," Hogan admits.
Pfft 2:
Hogan is more specific. "Forget Quantum of Solace, we would have directly observed the quantum of time," says Hogan.
Toot toot.

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squirrelboutique
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Re: be random about science

Post by squirrelboutique » Thu Jan 15, 2009 9:11 pm

Oh, I didn't mean that I believe it's happening. I just can't even understand what the one guy is saying is happening.

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Re: be random about science

Post by Gordon » Fri Jan 16, 2009 8:10 am

I know. Bizarrely I was thinking about in the shower.

If a hologram like on a credit card is a 3d projection from a 2d plane, then I imagine he's saying that our unverse could be a projection from some 2d plane on the edge of the universe (not sure if time comes into this). Just because the credit card hologram is only light reflections there's no reason that the particles reflected couldn't be ones that make up matter. Be advised, I have a biology degree...
Toot toot.

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Re: be random about science

Post by soft revolution » Fri Jan 16, 2009 10:13 am

I skim read the article last night before going to bed - I think this is one of those cases where there's a mathematical proof which predicts that something could be true and the task is to find observational evidence for it. The article suggests they've found some observational measurements which could be interpreted as evidence for it.

I'm not sure I get it though. Wouldn't any reflection from the edge of the universe be effected by both the speed of light and the expansion of the universe. And as some galaxies are relatively moving away from us faster than the speed of light (which means, quite terrifyingly that if we could observe them, we'd see clusters of galaxies just vanish into thin air) then does that mean that the observable edge of the universe is also doing so. So how can we be reflections from the edge of a universe which is moving away from us faster than the reflection can be projected?

I just don't get it, am I taking something too literally. Physics is well confusing, especially when you're trying to comprehend a phenomena based on mathematics.
And by me, I mean, Flexo.

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Re: be random about science

Post by nanski » Fri Apr 24, 2009 4:18 am

today i learned that apples originally come from central asia. and wild apple trees have leaves that go red in fall much more than cultivated (is that the word i want) apple trees. and that there's been a big controversy in biology for many years as to why leaves go read, but it's looking alot like it's because the red leaves are more resistant to aphids.

that's probably the most i've learned from one short article in a long time.
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Re: be random about science

Post by frogblast » Sun May 10, 2009 12:36 am

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree ... -companies

oh dear
In a statement to The Scientist magazine, Elsevier at first said the company "does not today consider a compilation of reprinted articles a 'journal'". I would like to expand on this statement: It was a collection of academic journal articles, published by the academic journal publisher Elsevier, in an academic journal-shaped package. Perhaps if it wasn't an academic journal they could have made this clearer in the title which, I should have mentioned, was named: The Australasian Journal of Bone and Joint Medicine.

Things have deteriorated since. It turns out that Elsevier put out six such journals, sponsored by industry. The Elsevier chief executive, Michael Hansen, has now admitted that they were made to look like journals, and lacked proper disclosure. "This was an unacceptable practice and we regret that it took place," he said.
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Re: be random about science

Post by nanski » Thu Jun 04, 2009 7:22 am

i'm interested in patterns and there's this weed here in okinawa that has me very excited. it is a flowering weed, and it's flowers go around in a spiral around the central stem. each individual flower looks like an orchid--i.e., it is bilaterally symmetric, not radially symmetric. each flower has a pretty gradient of white to purple. it's just a weed, but it's so cool. i realize it's a bit sad that i'm excited about a weed.

in other spiral pattern news, one of the new species found this year is a snail that has four spiral axes. i've only read that description but haven't found a picture. i'll post one here if i find it. i should take a picture of the weed, too, at some point.
big hole! big hole! big hole! big man! big man!

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Re: be random about science

Post by Mr Bear » Tue Jul 28, 2009 10:24 am

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8170033.stm
A dye similar to that used in sweets may potentially minimise the severity of spinal cord injuries.
Really, tell me more...
A cascade of molecular changes triggered in the hours following an initial injury can cause further severe damage to the spinal cord.

But US researchers found this can be halted by using a dye known as Brilliant Blue G (BBG).
That's amazing!
However, rats given the treatment in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences study turned blue.
Image

Oh...

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Re: be random about science

Post by Gordon » Tue Jul 28, 2009 3:26 pm

Brilliant.
Toot toot.

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Re: be random about science

Post by soft revolution » Sun Sep 13, 2009 9:53 pm

Yes! They Might Be Giants have done a Science album

And by me, I mean, Flexo.

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Re: be random about science

Post by yubo » Fri Oct 30, 2009 7:19 pm

I find science not so exciting in the everyday job aspect, but this is kind of cool:

Butt.

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Re: be random about science

Post by indiansummer » Tue Apr 20, 2010 3:14 pm

HOLY FUCK

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... louse.html

(i don't know if this should go here - if someone wants to shift it, sound)
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Re: be random about science

Post by soft revolution » Tue Apr 20, 2010 4:17 pm

Here's the right place - especially under the Trivial Pursuit definition of science.

(Plus it might get the thread moving).

It is like something from Starship Troopers isn't it. I bet I can guess what the angle of the story would have been if it was found in British waters though.
And by me, I mean, Flexo.

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Re: be random about science

Post by indiansummer » Tue Apr 20, 2010 6:03 pm

soft revolution wrote:It is like something from Starship Troopers isn't it. I bet I can guess what the angle of the story would have been if it was found in British waters though.
"more evidence of the awfulness of Brown's britain?"

It's surely only a matter of time before they rise from the sea and devour us all.

I for one welcome our new overlords.
halo my middle, a hula hoop hug

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