STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

we don't know but perhaps a fellow anorak will - ask them here
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humblebee
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Post by humblebee » Tue Jan 15, 2008 11:20

That's useful - thanks.

I'm starting to wonder whether the copy editor has tried to alter the author's MS from UK to US English and just not made a very good job of it, because I've just come across "theatre" and "licence". I seem to think "license" is the form always used in US English, and it should definitely be "theater", shouldn't it?

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Post by crystalball » Tue Jan 15, 2008 11:52

humblebee wrote:That's useful - thanks.

I'm starting to wonder whether the copy editor has tried to alter the author's MS from UK to US English and just not made a very good job of it, because I've just come across "theatre" and "licence". I seem to think "license" is the form always used in US English, and it should definitely be "theater", shouldn't it?
It looks like a half-arsed copyediting job. I'd ask the person who commissioned you for the copyeditor's brief from the publisher. It should tell you what style they want it to be.

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Post by humblebee » Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:52

crystalball wrote:It looks like a half-arsed copyediting job. I'd ask the person who commissioned you for the copyeditor's brief from the publisher. It should tell you what style they want it to be.
Oh, it clearly should be in US English. It's published by the New York version of the CUP and it says "honor" all the time and puts the following comma or full stop inside the inverted commas even when the quote isn't a full sentence.

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Post by Contravene » Tue Jan 15, 2008 13:00

humblebee wrote:
crystalball wrote:It looks like a half-arsed copyediting job. I'd ask the person who commissioned you for the copyeditor's brief from the publisher. It should tell you what style they want it to be.
Oh, it clearly should be in US English. It's published by the New York version of the CUP and it says "honor" all the time and puts the following comma or full stop inside the inverted commas even when the quote isn't a full sentence.
*horrified*
Time for a bit of linguagistic imperialism perhaps? We did invent the language after all.

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Post by crystalball » Wed Feb 13, 2008 11:23

I agree with you, gloomy-bee.

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Post by humblebee » Wed Feb 13, 2008 11:28

I do too. Because you're right.

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by humblebee » Thu Mar 20, 2008 12:01

gloom button wrote:Is there ever any sensible reason to say "ramp up"? If someone's ramping up a system over several days, can I just edit the document to say they're introducing the system over several days, without losing any meaning?
I think 'ramp up' implies a gradual increase in capacity or power or function. When the new Wembley stadium opened, they said that before the first match where the full capacity was used, there would be some "ramp-up events" with a reduced but steadily increasing capacity, just to make sure everything was working OK before the proper thing.

So it does serve a semantic purpose. That's not to say that it couldn't still be replaced with something better, of course, because it does sound horribly jargony, and not every reader will be aware of the meaning it implies.

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by crystalball » Tue May 13, 2008 11:13

What would you write: 'a hilarious cameo' or 'an hilarious cameo'?

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by bocken » Tue May 13, 2008 11:18

crystalball wrote:What would you write: 'a hilarious cameo' or 'an hilarious cameo'?
Was it really hilarious? Would amusing suffice?

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by humblebee » Tue May 13, 2008 11:31

crystalball wrote:What would you write: 'a hilarious cameo' or 'an hilarious cameo'?
'A hilarious cameo'. All of those 'an historic'-type exceptions just sound pretentious to me.

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by crystalball » Tue May 13, 2008 11:43

No, it wasn't that hilarious and thanks, Pete, that's what I thought too. In your face Twentienth Century Fox!

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by SophieC » Tue May 13, 2008 14:33

20th century grammar more like.
When the people are being beaten with a stick, they are not much happier if it is called 'the People's Stick.'

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by Colin » Thu Jul 10, 2008 10:45

It's not an emergency (or really to do with grammar) but if I'm listing surnames in alphabetical order, how should I deal with names beginning Mc or Mac? I would normally list them like this, for example:

Mackie
MacKinnon
McKendrick

But I've got an inkling that the A in Mac is usually disregarded and that you should go by the first unique letter after the Mc or Mac. So McKendrick would go above MacKinnon, because the E comes before I. Is that right?
You'd think I'd have worked this out, being Scottish and everything.
Last edited by Colin on Thu Jul 10, 2008 11:35, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by crystalball » Thu Jul 10, 2008 11:02

That's the standard in book publishing, Colin: Mc is still treated as Mac.

It's political correctness gone mad, if you ask me.

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by Gordon » Thu Jul 10, 2008 15:29

Which round does it go, though? would Maddock come after both or before both?
Toot toot.

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by crystalball » Thu Jul 10, 2008 15:42

After, because C comes before D in the alphabet. Is that what you're asking?

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by grumpytimes » Thu Jul 10, 2008 16:39

I'm often unsure where a name that goes mab... (so the letter after 'a' comes before 'c' in the alphabet)would be placed: before or after the M(a)c? I just looked on the shelf at our library and a Macedo is after MacVictor in the biography section - but it may just be a shelving error.

I guess what I'm asking is, do people think m(a)c should be treated as its own letter that comes between 'L' and 'M'?

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by Gordon » Thu Jul 10, 2008 17:04

crystalball wrote:After, because C comes before D in the alphabet. Is that what you're asking?
Yep. Just seems silly, though.
Toot toot.

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Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by crystalball » Thu Jul 10, 2008 17:49

grumpytimes wrote:I'm often unsure where a name that goes mab... (so the letter after 'a' comes before 'c' in the alphabet)would be placed: before or after the M(a)c? I just looked on the shelf at our library and a Macedo is after MacVictor in the biography section - but it may just be a shelving error.

I guess what I'm asking is, do people think m(a)c should be treated as its own letter that comes between 'L' and 'M'?
I wouldn't treat M(a)c as its own letter. The choice is between treating Mc differently to Mac or pretending they are the same thing. I think the phone book treats everything as Mac, right? In publishing editors tend to do the same. It's not a rule or anything as long as you are consistent.

This used to be a green and pleasant land before all those inconsistents arrived, you know. They come over 'ere...

alongwalkhome

Re: STET this STAT: a grammar emergency thread!

Post by alongwalkhome » Thu Jul 10, 2008 17:55

grumpytimes wrote:I'm often unsure where a name that goes mab... (so the letter after 'a' comes before 'c' in the alphabet)would be placed: before or after the M(a)c? I just looked on the shelf at our library and a Macedo is after MacVictor in the biography section - but it may just be a shelving error.

I guess what I'm asking is, do people think m(a)c should be treated as its own letter that comes between 'L' and 'M'?
In phonebooks here--I haven't seen one in, like, 15 years cuz of the Web and all--the M(a)cs used to come first before any of the other "M" names.

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