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Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Fri Feb 27, 2009 7:52 pm
by Big Nose
soft revolution wrote:Ever wanted to play a ROM Check Fail


The defender spaceship has a hard time of it.
That genius. If you are a MAME nerd. And I am...

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Fri Feb 27, 2009 8:35 pm
by String Bean Jen
Oregon Trail - on old Macs, on a black background with green caveman-esque font. There are updated versions of this classic game available for modern computers in full colors but why the hell would you want to play that!? I want to fail to forge a river and have my child die of dysentery in black and green.

If anyone can point me to an old version of this classic, please do.

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Sat Feb 28, 2009 1:08 am
by Sootyzilla

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Sat Feb 28, 2009 6:04 am
by String Bean Jen
Sootyzilla wrote:Your wish is my command.

http://www.virtualapple.org/oregontraildisk.html
Hee! Thank you. :-) Though even that version looks a bit modern for my Oregon Trail taste (it's in color). I've just had a ball naming my expedition party members.

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Sat Feb 28, 2009 11:58 am
by soft revolution
String Bean Jen wrote:Oregon Trail - on old Macs, on a black background with green caveman-esque font. There are updated versions of this classic game available for modern computers in full colors but why the hell would you want to play that!? I want to fail to forge a river and have my child die of dysentery in black and green.

If anyone can point me to an old version of this classic, please do.
I used to play this brilliant education/computer game called Dinosaur Island. The plan was you had to hatch a dinosaur egg, but you had to go to the library to find out what colour the eggs of different dinosaurs were so that you didn't hatch a T Rex by accident. You also had to look up how long to incubate them for or you'd end up with a big old boiled egg.

The scary bit was sailing over to the island because if you got the time of the low tide wrong you'd run aground on some rocks.

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Mon Jul 05, 2010 6:07 pm
by Big Nose
In memory of Chris Sievey AKA Frank Sidebottom, I have been playing "The Biz" recently.

What Chris wrote.

It was written for the ZX Spectrum and is a music industry simulator (duh!?)

Fact fans might want to know he created the character (allegedly) of Frank Sidebottom for this game. The original cassette contained the game + some songs + interviews of Chris by Frank.

You can play it online here http://www.zxspectrum.net/ here. Scroll down to 1984....

Have patience with it, and you will be rewarded.

Its GREAT.

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Mon Jul 05, 2010 7:15 pm
by Damian
Big Nose wrote:In memory of Chris Sievey AKA Frank Sidebottom, I have been playing "The Biz" recently.

What Chris wrote.

It was written for the ZX Spectrum and is a music industry simulator (duh!?)

Fact fans might want to know he created the character (allegedly) of Frank Sidebottom for this game. The original cassette contained the game + some songs + interviews of Chris by Frank.

You can play it online here http://www.zxspectrum.net/ here. Scroll down to 1984....

Have patience with it, and you will be rewarded.

Its GREAT.
I've looked on that website loads of times, and played most of games on there (way back in the eighties and more recently) but I've never played this. I thought Rockstar Ate My Hamster was the only music industry simulator on the spectrum, but this is way better.

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:37 pm
by graysonscolumn
Carys wrote: We have an original 128k Spectrum, and my favourite game is Nifty Lifty. It's incredibly hard. Although often I find nowadays that the hardest thing is that the Spectrum isn't at all intuitive so you want to do something obvious and it throws a hissy fit.

Neato. We had Nifty Lifty on the Beeb as well. Sometimes the simplest games concepts are the best - just two keys (left and right) but a proper challenge, especially once some lifts start going through the floor and some don't, often arbitrarily!

gc

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:42 pm
by graysonscolumn
soft revolution wrote: I'm missing having a working BBC computer at the moment,
If you're ever in the Sheffield area, I've got several still on the go (including a Master), and an Electron. They got exhibited at CG-Expo UK in Croydon in 2004 and 2005, plus last year's Retro Reunited in Huddersfield, and will hopefully get another festie outing soon. Happy to take on allcomers on the likes of Galaforce, Banana Man, Cookie and anything else colourful and dumb, but my status on Elite is still "borderline cretinous", alas!

gc

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Mon Jan 24, 2011 6:11 pm
by moopind

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Mon Jan 24, 2011 9:37 pm
by graysonscolumn
Matthew Smith! I've met him! Would have been about the same time as that clip was filmed, I'd have thought.

From memory, most of his stuff was released on Software Projects - coincidentally the same label as put out the squirrel game Vinnie likes. Ergo some point or other.

gc

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Mon Jan 24, 2011 11:47 pm
by Wheatabeat
I've got Mame and half the time I can't be arsed with it, mainly because I don't have a joypad or joystick, and those games just ain't fun on a keyboard. But I swicthed it on tonight and got well back into Rainbow Islands again. Hello again, lost childhood of 1989-90.

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Thu Jul 14, 2011 8:20 pm
by Big Nose
I love this man. But I mostly love his keyboard.


Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Thu Jul 14, 2011 9:15 pm
by tompony
That's utterly wonderful!

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 10:35 am
by jayen_aitch
Last night, inspired by this thread I had another try at getting hold of radical castle, a mac game from Astrid's childhood that she remembers fondly. I've tried a few times over the years, but I actually got it to run on an emulator last night. She was happy, mission accomplished. Thanks thread.

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Fri Jul 22, 2011 9:54 am
by graysonscolumn
graysonscolumn wrote:
soft revolution wrote: I'm missing having a working BBC computer at the moment,
If you're ever in the Sheffield area, I've got several still on the go (including a Master), and an Electron. They got exhibited at CG-Expo UK in Croydon in 2004 and 2005, plus last year's Retro Reunited in Huddersfield, and will hopefully get another festie outing soon. Happy to take on allcomers on the likes of Galaforce, Banana Man, Cookie and anything else colourful and dumb, but my status on Elite is still "borderline cretinous", alas!

gc

Update: armada of BBCs / Electrons (and me with them) have all decamped up to That Leeds. Any closer to home for any would-be players?

Can't help thinking Dave Gorman vs The World would have been a better book with a chapter devoted to him taking me on at Arcadians...

gc

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:14 pm
by humblebee
Somebody's producing a console based on the Spectrum, preloaded with 1,000 games.

In Nottingham.

Image

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-no ... e-30810148

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Thu Jan 15, 2015 12:16 am
by tonieee
But how can you play Elite or The Hobbit with only 9 keys?

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Thu Jan 15, 2015 11:08 pm
by Yex
I used to love this game called Pirate: A Captain's Quest. It was set in the Caribbean during the age of piracy and you sail around the map in your ship. You start off by choosing to play as a pirate, privateer, or merchant, and choosing your country (the options were English, French, Dutch, or Spanish), and choosing your gender (which just affected your avatar). If you played as a merchant, you established trade routes or something, but that was boring. If you played as a privateer, you went to friendly ports, accepted bounties on ships of enemy countries, and then sank them and collected the bounty. If you were a pirate you just had to win a certain number of sword fights and sink a certain number of ships. In addition, you had to complete a cryptic task relating to the history of piracy. I never was able to pull that off.

One of the best parts of the game was that practically every step of the way your logbook opened up and gave you historical background on what was going on. Practically, it could be a little annoying when you were trying to play, but it was still a nice gesture. I think the game was put out by the discovery channel.

I actually found something called abandonware that's supposed to play the game, but I can't figure out how to get the old mac OS emulator to work.

Image

Re: Archaic but brilliant computer games we miss

Posted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 2:16 pm
by graysonscolumn
tompony wrote:
There's a great site for games and stuff too, I THINK it's:

http://www.stairwaytohell.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

But harsh internet blocks prevent me from checking it out!

Only just spotted mention of the STH site on this thread - I donated a sackload of games/scans/triv to STH well over a decade ago! I also co-edited the less internet blocker-baiting site The BBC Games Archive, but I've no idea if co-conspirator Cris still has that up and working at present. Should be stuff to download from there as well, if he has, but either STH or 8bs or The BBC Lives! are by our own admission more comprehensive repositories than ours ever was.

gc