DIY adventures, advice and so forth

like, y'know, crafty stuff, exercise, walking, gardening...
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noodlé
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by noodlé » Tue Mar 17, 2009 3:01 pm

linus wrote:I probably wouldn't
of course not. either because you're SMART or because you don't know where to buy it. but, either way, it's a win.


cara... if you just want to patch something up for the short-term then i SUPPOSE it will do. just don't ask me to like it. though, why not replace carpet with carpet? new carpet smells nice.
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caramarydaisy
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by caramarydaisy » Tue Mar 17, 2009 3:06 pm

noodlé wrote: cara... if you just want to patch something up for the short-term then i SUPPOSE it will do. just don't ask me to like it. though, why not replace carpet with carpet? new carpet smells nice.

well i GUESS i could.. but i have massive heavy drawers under my bed, and i figured maybe they would be easier to pull out on laminate than carpet. and laminate is easier to sweep/hoover to keep clean than carpet, especially how often i seem to be knocking over drinks/spilling things lately. im probably going to be in my flat for long enough to make it worthwhile, but leaving the new occupants with nice wooden floors seems a bit unnecessary. i dont think theyd appreciate it/care/notice.
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frogblast
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by frogblast » Tue Mar 17, 2009 9:21 pm

noodlé wrote: this may offend anyone who has chosen to have laminate flooring... but don't have laminate flooring. it's RUBBISH. spend a few extra quid and do things properly. unless you plan on seling up and moving out within a few years.

professionally fitted decent quality laminate will look and last ok... but for what it costs you're well on the way to paying for lower quality real flooring.. and that will be better. it looks better, it feels better, it's more durable, and it will generally be more forgiving of the 'diy' installer.

'laminated' is another way of saying 'photocopied'. THINK ON THAT!! would you buy a photocopied carpet? would you? WOULD YOU?

normally i'm a massive snob about thing pretending to be wood when they aren't (or being brilliant white plastic when they should be wood - uPVC windows are one of my top pet hates. although that's partly because my uncle makes hardwood windows and taught me the evils of uPVC).

however, i just can't get very worked up about laminate flooring - i think it's fine in bedrooms, and i far prefer it to a thick heavy shag (har har). laminate can be tougher than real wood flooring. and it's much easier to fit than carpet (and easier to fit than a real wood floor)

i am partial to those carpets that are kind of woven and hard. i'm not sure how to describe them. kind of like this, but as a fitted carpet:
Image

last summer i saw some ceramic tiles that had a wood pattern printed on them. i stood there in the diy shop for a good ten minutes trying to work out why the hell anybody ever thought that would be a good idea. look: http://www.wickes.co.uk/Ceramic-Floor-T ... nvt/165978 (the picture really doesn't show how hideous they are in real life)

edit: corrected my quoting.
Last edited by frogblast on Tue Mar 17, 2009 11:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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caramarydaisy
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by caramarydaisy » Tue Mar 17, 2009 10:16 pm

frogblast wrote:
noodle wrote: this may offend anyone who has chosen to have laminate flooring... but don't have laminate flooring. it's RUBBISH. spend a few extra quid and do things properly. unless you plan on seling up and moving out within a few years.

professionally fitted decent quality laminate will look and last ok... but for what it costs you're well on the way to paying for lower quality real flooring.. and that will be better. it looks better, it feels better, it's more durable, and it will generally be more forgiving of the 'diy' installer.

'laminated' is another way of saying 'photocopied'. THINK ON THAT!! would you buy a photocopied carpet? would you? WOULD YOU?
normally i'm a massive snob about thing pretending to be wood when they aren't (or being brilliant white plastic when they should be wood - uPVC windows are one of my top pet hates. although that's partly because my uncle makes hardwood windows and taught me the evils of uPVC).

however, i just can't get very worked up about laminate flooring - i think it's fine in bedrooms, and i far prefer it to a thick heavy shag (har har). laminate can be tougher than real wood flooring. and it's much easier to fit than carpet (and easier to fit than a real wood floor)

i am partial to those carpets that are kind of woven and hard. i'm not sure how to describe them. kind of like this, but as a fitted carpet:
Image

last summer i saw some ceramic tiles that had a wood pattern printed on them. i stood there in the diy shop for a good ten minutes trying to work out why the hell anybody ever thought that would be a good idea. look: http://www.wickes.co.uk/Ceramic-Floor-T ... nvt/165978 (the picture really doesn't show how hideous they are in real life)
heh quotes gone wrong - i didnt say that it was nooodle!

with you on upvc windows tho..ick
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by soft revolution » Tue Mar 17, 2009 11:19 pm

I've had about 3 aborted attempts to put up a curtain rail in my house. Any attempt at putting a screw into a rawl plug pulls out a chunk of shitty plaster, and I've tried a lot of rawl plugs in holes of different sizes (even the ones that are designed for shitty plaster) and used a lot of polyfiller to fix it. Grrr.

I've just about given up now. There shall be no curtains in my front room.
And by me, I mean, Flexo.

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squirrelboutique
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by squirrelboutique » Tue Mar 17, 2009 11:22 pm

Mine are sort of nailed/bent/twisted into the wall after similar experiences. Touching any part of any curtain in this house would result in a rumpled mess of curtains and bent curtain rods everywhere.

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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by Pablo » Fri Mar 20, 2009 1:19 pm

caramarydaisy wrote:i have a really massive heavy frame i would love to hang but on a wall thats all hollow and crappy cos its a new flat. i dont think im even going to attempt to do that myself, but get someone in to sort it when i get loads of shelves put up in a cupboard.

other things i might try and attempt include resealing around my bath. how easy is this? you just get one of those gun type things dont you?? how do you get the old sealant up?
Old sealant can be a bit of a mare to get rid of, depending on how well it's sticking to the surfaces it once sealed. I suggest a compination of a very sharp knife (but try not to scratch anything) and some sort of solvent, and a lot of patience.

When applying sealant around the edge of a bath, fill the bath with water first, because it sinks a bit when you're in it, potentially ruining your careful handiwork. Apply the sealant sparingly, and use a wet finger to smooth it off, as the moisture stops your finger from sticking to it too much. It takes a bit of practice
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caramarydaisy
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by caramarydaisy » Fri Mar 20, 2009 1:37 pm

Pablo wrote:
caramarydaisy wrote:i have a really massive heavy frame i would love to hang but on a wall thats all hollow and crappy cos its a new flat. i dont think im even going to attempt to do that myself, but get someone in to sort it when i get loads of shelves put up in a cupboard.

other things i might try and attempt include resealing around my bath. how easy is this? you just get one of those gun type things dont you?? how do you get the old sealant up?
Old sealant can be a bit of a mare to get rid of, depending on how well it's sticking to the surfaces it once sealed. I suggest a compination of a very sharp knife (but try not to scratch anything) and some sort of solvent, and a lot of patience.

When applying sealant around the edge of a bath, fill the bath with water first, because it sinks a bit when you're in it, potentially ruining your careful handiwork. Apply the sealant sparingly, and use a wet finger to smooth it off, as the moisture stops your finger from sticking to it too much. It takes a bit of practice
oh, thanks for all that!! what sort of solvent would you recommend using tho??

my friend seems to think she knows what shes doing with this, but fililng the bath is a very good tip - id have never thought of that!
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Uncle Ants
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by Uncle Ants » Fri Mar 20, 2009 1:40 pm

caramarydaisy wrote: my friend seems to think she knows what shes doing with this, but fililng the bath is a very good tip - id have never thought of that!
Filling the bath is a very, very good tip. Whoever did ours before we had to redo it hadn't though about it and it leaked like a seive.
In Recordeo Speramus

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caramarydaisy
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by caramarydaisy » Fri Mar 20, 2009 2:07 pm

Uncle Ants wrote:
caramarydaisy wrote: my friend seems to think she knows what shes doing with this, but fililng the bath is a very good tip - id have never thought of that!
Filling the bath is a very, very good tip. Whoever did ours before we had to redo it hadn't though about it and it leaked like a seive.
and so presumably you have to leave the water in while it all sets.. is it about 24 hours yr meant to not get the sealant wet?

does the bath not 'spring back up' once the water is drained or by that point has it dried and stuck in that position? is that a stupid question?
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by Uncle Ants » Fri Mar 20, 2009 2:20 pm

caramarydaisy wrote: and so presumably you have to leave the water in while it all sets.. is it about 24 hours yr meant to not get the sealant wet?

does the bath not 'spring back up' once the water is drained or by that point has it dried and stuck in that position? is that a stupid question?
Yes leave it in while it sets, by then it's dried and stuck and it squishes together rather than tears away at the edges. No it's not a stupid question.
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Pablo
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by Pablo » Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:59 am

caramarydaisy wrote:
oh, thanks for all that!! what sort of solvent would you recommend using tho??

my friend seems to think she knows what shes doing with this, but fililng the bath is a very good tip - id have never thought of that!
Something like this: http://www.screwfix.com/prods/17175/Sea ... &source=aw

It's still quite hard work though, even with something like this to help you
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by Sootyzilla » Sun Mar 22, 2009 6:38 pm

What do I need to drill a hole in a stockpot?
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by a layer of chips » Sun Mar 22, 2009 7:16 pm

A penis like a jackhammer.

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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by Sootyzilla » Sun Mar 22, 2009 7:41 pm

Sorted then.
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Pablo
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by Pablo » Sun Mar 22, 2009 8:26 pm

Sootyzilla wrote:What do I need to drill a hole in a stockpot?
Assuming it's made of metal, an HSS (High Speed Steel) drill bit.

And a drill
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Sootyzilla
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by Sootyzilla » Sun Mar 22, 2009 8:48 pm

where do i get one of those and are they expensive? will it fit on my cheap Woolworths electric drill or do i need a proper one?
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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by jayen_aitch » Sun Mar 22, 2009 8:49 pm

Why do you want a hole in it?

Anyone know much about renewing the sealant on a bath-tub? ...it's something I hoped to do this weekend before other things got in the way.

I understand it should be done while the bath is full, but that's as much as I know.

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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by a layer of chips » Sun Mar 22, 2009 9:04 pm

Never heard that before, Jonny! Although I can understand why you'd fill the bath up. Read up the thread a bit, though.

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Re: DIY adventures, advice and so forth

Post by jayen_aitch » Sun Mar 22, 2009 9:18 pm

Oh yeah, thanks... I thought it was all jackhammer penises up there.

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